The Evil Eye Rosary

CAD $50.00

Attempts to ward off the curse of the evil eye have resulted in a number of talismans in many cultures. As a class, they are called “apotropaic” (Greek for “prophylactic” / προφυλακτικός or “protective”, literally: “turns away”) talismans, meaning that they turn away or turn back harm, in some forms of the folklore, the staring eyes are supposed to bend the malicious gaze back to the sorcerer. Which brings us to this amulet I have created.. “A rosary you say!? isn’t that kinda weird?” I love old religious iconography, I use saints & religious artifacts in my spellwork, & have no issues or qualms doing so. Catholics believe the Rosary is a remedy against severe trials, temptations and the hardships of life, and that the Rosary is one of the great weapons given to believers in their battle against every evil. Could this not be more fitting?

Known as nazar (Turkish: nazar boncuğu or nazarlık), this talisman is most frequently seen in Turkey, found in or on houses and vehicles or worn as beads.

The evil eye is a curse or legend believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when one is unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury, while others believe it to be a kind of supernatural force that casts or reflects a malevolent gaze back-upon those who wish harm upon others (especially innocents). Talismans or amulets created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called “evil eyes”.

The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, but it is especially prominent in the Mediterranean and West Asia. The idea appears multiple times in Jewish rabbinic literature. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations with eye-like symbols known as nazars, which are used to repel the evil eye, are a common sight across Cyprus, Greece, Portugal, Brazil, Israel, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Albania, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Turkey, Palestine, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Nepal, Pakistan, parts of India, Morocco, southern Spain, parts of Mexico, Malta, Montenegro, Romania, Bulgaria, the Balkans, the Levant, Afghanistan, Syria, and Bahrain, and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists. Other popular amulets and talismans used to ward off the evil eye include the hamsa, while Italy (especially Southern Italy) employs a variety of other unique charms and gestures to defend against the evil eye, including the cornicello, the cimaruta, and the sign of the horns.

Can be worn or hung in your home to aid in protection against general evil and the evil eye.

In stock

Description

Attempts to ward off the curse of the evil eye have resulted in a number of talismans in many cultures. As a class, they are called “apotropaic” (Greek for “prophylactic” / προφυλακτικός or “protective”, literally: “turns away”) talismans, meaning that they turn away or turn back harm, in some forms of the folklore, the staring eyes are supposed to bend the malicious gaze back to the sorcerer. Which brings us to this amulet I have created.. “A rosary you say!? isn’t that kinda weird?” I love old religious iconography, I use saints & religious artifacts in my spellwork, & have no issues or qualms doing so. Catholics believe the Rosary is a remedy against severe trials, temptations and the hardships of life, and that the Rosary is one of the great weapons given to believers in their battle against every evil. Could this not be more fitting?

Known as nazar (Turkish: nazar boncuğu or nazarlık), this talisman is most frequently seen in Turkey, found in or on houses and vehicles or worn as beads.

The evil eye is a curse or legend believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when one is unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury, while others believe it to be a kind of supernatural force that casts or reflects a malevolent gaze back-upon those who wish harm upon others (especially innocents). Talismans or amulets created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called “evil eyes”.

The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, but it is especially prominent in the Mediterranean and West Asia. The idea appears multiple times in Jewish rabbinic literature. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations with eye-like symbols known as nazars, which are used to repel the evil eye, are a common sight across Cyprus, Greece, Portugal, Brazil, Israel, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Albania, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Turkey, Palestine, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Nepal, Pakistan, parts of India, Morocco, southern Spain, parts of Mexico, Malta, Montenegro, Romania, Bulgaria, the Balkans, the Levant, Afghanistan, Syria, and Bahrain, and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists. Other popular amulets and talismans used to ward off the evil eye include the hamsa, while Italy (especially Southern Italy) employs a variety of other unique charms and gestures to defend against the evil eye, including the cornicello, the cimaruta, and the sign of the horns.

Can be worn or hung in your home to aid in protection against general evil and the evil eye.

Additional information

Weight 40 g
Dimensions 5 × 5 × 5 cm

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