Kot of Veles Ritual Reliquary Bowl

CAD $500.00

Those that shall not be Named x TheWitchery.Ca

Veles, also known as Volos (Russian: Волос, Влас, Власий), is a major Slavic god of earth, waters, livestock, and the underworld. One of few Slavic gods for which evidence of offerings can be found in all Slavic nations. The Primary Chronicle, a historical record of the early Kievan Rus, is the earliest and most important record, mentioning a god named Volos several times. Here, Volos is mentioned as god of cattle and peasants, who will punish oath-breakers with diseases, the opposite of Perun who is described as a ruling god of war who punishes by death in battle. In the later half of the 10th century, Veles or Volos was one of seven gods whose statues Vladimir I of Kiev had erected in his city. It is very interesting that Veles’ statue apparently did not stand next to others, on the hill where the prince’s castle was, but lower in the city, in the marketplace. Not only does this indicate that Veles was connected with commerce, but it also shows that worship of Perun and Veles had to be kept separate: while it was proper for Perun’s shrines to be built high, on the top of the hill, Veles’ place was down, in the lowlands.

He is the God of crossroads and “twin” places (along with Chur), wisdom, prosperity, trade, merchants, shepherds, cunning men, mathematicians, & also the patron of Nava – the world of spirits

Standing in eternal opposition to the great God of Light, he is often mentioned as being accompanied by a great furry cat (at times said to appear as one himself), resulting in the image of cat and mouse being seen in old Russian folklore as analogous to the never ceasing struggle between good and evil, dark and light, the world and the underworld. To this day, Russian superstition still stands that cats are guides to the underworld, and those who will be shortly passing away will see Death come to them as a cat.

The idea that cats are the guardians of the home would seem to run against this dark view of cats, but it is obviously with regard to Veles and the underworld that the crossing of a new home’s threshold (that magical boundary between ‘worlds’) must first be done by none other than a cat to ensure the safety of all who dwell in it. Furthermore, old Russian superstition dictates that a new home’s bed, that one place in a house where people can be most vulnerable and in the most need of supernatural guardianship while they sleep, is best put where the threshold-crossing cat first laid down.

Like other Slavic neopagans’ holidays, the day of Veles is based on folklore, in Christian folk rituals, the festival of Veles (celebrated around 11 Feb or 24) corresponds to the day of saint Blaise. During the festival, prayers are offered to Veles for protection of the livestock and health by sacrificing milk. An important part of the festival is a feast held near the place of worship (e.g. a temple), during which it is strictly forbidden to eat veal. The main dish eaten during the Weles festival is groats richly seasoned with fat.The celebrations are often accompanied by the organization of ritual fights.

This pewter cat skull was hand cast and engraved by witches who will not be named.

One 100% Pewter skull nestled inside a vintage slavic wood bowl & Veles anointing ritual oil.

Only 2 when they are gone they are gone.

Only 2 left in stock

Description

Those that shall not be Named x TheWitchery.Ca

Veles, also known as Volos (Russian: Волос, Влас, Власий), is a major Slavic god of earth, waters, livestock, and the underworld. One of few Slavic gods for which evidence of offerings can be found in all Slavic nations. The Primary Chronicle, a historical record of the early Kievan Rus, is the earliest and most important record, mentioning a god named Volos several times. Here, Volos is mentioned as god of cattle and peasants, who will punish oath-breakers with diseases, the opposite of Perun who is described as a ruling god of war who punishes by death in battle. In the later half of the 10th century, Veles or Volos was one of seven gods whose statues Vladimir I of Kiev had erected in his city. It is very interesting that Veles’ statue apparently did not stand next to others, on the hill where the prince’s castle was, but lower in the city, in the marketplace. Not only does this indicate that Veles was connected with commerce, but it also shows that worship of Perun and Veles had to be kept separate: while it was proper for Perun’s shrines to be built high, on the top of the hill, Veles’ place was down, in the lowlands.

He is the God of crossroads and “twin” places (along with Chur), wisdom, prosperity, trade, merchants, shepherds, cunning men, mathematicians, & also the patron of Nava – the world of spirits

Standing in eternal opposition to the great God of Light, he is often mentioned as being accompanied by a great furry cat (at times said to appear as one himself), resulting in the image of cat and mouse being seen in old Russian folklore as analogous to the never ceasing struggle between good and evil, dark and light, the world and the underworld. To this day, Russian superstition still stands that cats are guides to the underworld, and those who will be shortly passing away will see Death come to them as a cat.

The idea that cats are the guardians of the home would seem to run against this dark view of cats, but it is obviously with regard to Veles and the underworld that the crossing of a new home’s threshold (that magical boundary between ‘worlds’) must first be done by none other than a cat to ensure the safety of all who dwell in it. Furthermore, old Russian superstition dictates that a new home’s bed, that one place in a house where people can be most vulnerable and in the most need of supernatural guardianship while they sleep, is best put where the threshold-crossing cat first laid down.

Like other Slavic neopagans’ holidays, the day of Veles is based on folklore, in Christian folk rituals, the festival of Veles (celebrated around 11 Feb or 24) corresponds to the day of saint Blaise. During the festival, prayers are offered to Veles for protection of the livestock and health by sacrificing milk. An important part of the festival is a feast held near the place of worship (e.g. a temple), during which it is strictly forbidden to eat veal. The main dish eaten during the Weles festival is groats richly seasoned with fat.The celebrations are often accompanied by the organization of ritual fights.

This pewter cat skull was hand cast and engraved by witches who will not be named.

One 100% Pewter skull nestled inside a vintage slavic wood bowl & Veles anointing ritual oil.

Only 2 when they are gone they are gone.

Additional information

Weight 1055 g
Dimensions 21 × 21 × 12 cm

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