Joss Japanese Pine Incense Sticks

CAD $10.00

The burning of incense in Japan began during the 6th century (the Asuka period) with the introduction of Buddhism, which uses incense during rituals and ceremonies. Agarwood was imported into Japan from China via Korea. From that point on, incense would become an important facet of Japanese culture. Incense is used for a variety of purposes, including Buddhist ceremonies, spirituality and meditation. Samurai warriors would prepare for battle by purifying their minds and bodies with the incense of koboku; developing an appreciation for its fragrances. In the late Muromachi period in the 16th century, this aesthetic awareness would develop into the accomplishment known as kōdō, which is the art of enjoying the incense of smouldering koboku. The present style of kōdō has largely retained the structure and manner of the Muromachi period, in which time the tea ceremony and the ikebana style of flower arrangement developed as well.

There are two major types of incense in Japan, which are either heating or smouldering small pieces of fragrant wood, or direct-burning incense in form of sticks or cones formed out of paste without a bamboo stick. Many of the current incense companies have been in existence for more than 300 years.

These sticks are a combination of Pine Needles blended with green, very mild Sandalwood powder

Burn incense as offerings, to carry your wishes, desires, and when casting your spellwork.

1 Roll of stickless self-igniting incense sticks

In stock

Description

The burning of incense in Japan began during the 6th century (the Asuka period) with the introduction of Buddhism, which uses incense during rituals and ceremonies. Agarwood was imported into Japan from China via Korea. From that point on, incense would become an important facet of Japanese culture. Incense is used for a variety of purposes, including Buddhist ceremonies, spirituality and meditation. Samurai warriors would prepare for battle by purifying their minds and bodies with the incense of koboku; developing an appreciation for its fragrances. In the late Muromachi period in the 16th century, this aesthetic awareness would develop into the accomplishment known as kōdō, which is the art of enjoying the incense of smouldering koboku. The present style of kōdō has largely retained the structure and manner of the Muromachi period, in which time the tea ceremony and the ikebana style of flower arrangement developed as well.

There are two major types of incense in Japan, which are either heating or smouldering small pieces of fragrant wood, or direct-burning incense in form of sticks or cones formed out of paste without a bamboo stick. Many of the current incense companies have been in existence for more than 300 years.

These sticks are a combination of Pine Needles blended with green, very mild Sandalwood powder

Burn incense as offerings, to carry your wishes, desires, and when casting your spellwork.

1 Roll of stickless self-igniting incense sticks

Additional information

Weight 150 g
Dimensions 20 × 5 × 1 cm

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