Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions

CAD $30.00

 Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions by Corinne Boyer Law of Contagion Monograph Series 2

Shamanism, religion and magic have long acknowledged the significance of dreams as a bridge to the spirit world, and over time developed practices for dream incubation. Many such practices involved plants, and were operant at the folk level, seeking to incept dreams of a prophetic nature, to obtain knowledge of future loves, fortunes, births and deaths. In Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions, Corinne Boyer draws together many strands of plant dream-lore, focusing on dream-divination. Bringing old lore to life with modern insight and a practical approach, she examines the many ways of using flowers, fruits, branches and leaves to make contact with the oneiric realm. With original illustrations by Peter Köhler.

In stock

SKU: Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions Categories: , , , , , Tags: , ,

Description

Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions by Corinne Boyer Law of Contagion Monograph Series 2

Shamanism, religion and magic have long acknowledged the significance of dreams as a bridge to the spirit world, and over time developed practices for dream incubation. Many such practices involved plants, and were operant at the folk level, seeking to incept dreams of a prophetic nature, to obtain knowledge of future loves, fortunes, births and deaths. In Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions, Corinne Boyer draws together many strands of plant dream-lore, focusing on dream-divination. Bringing old lore to life with modern insight and a practical approach, she examines the many ways of using flowers, fruits, branches and leaves to make contact with the oneiric realm. With original illustrations by Peter Köhler.

Additional information

Weight 1100 g
Dimensions 23 × 15 × 5 cm

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Dream Divination Plants in Northwestern European Traditions”

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This