Slavic Tea Pot Antique

CAD $85.00

In Slavic mythology, vodyanoy or vodyanoi (Russian: водяно́й, lit. ‘[he] from the water’ or ‘watery’) is a male water spirit. Vodyanoy is said to appear as a naked old man with a frog-like face, greenish beard, and long hair, with his body covered in algae and muck, usually covered in black fish scales. He has webbed paws instead of hands, a fish’s tail, and eyes that burn like red-hot coals. He usually rides along his river on a half-sunken log, making loud splashes. Consequently, he is often dubbed “grandfather” or “forefather” by the local people. Local drownings are said to be the work of the vodyanoy (or rusalkas).

Folktales mention him as being both evil and good vodníci (relative to human beings) who do (or don’t, respectively) try to drown people when they happen to swim in their territory. Vodníci would store the souls of the drowned in porcelain teapots. They consider their teapots their most valuable heritage and display their “work”, using the number of teapots to represent their wealth and/or status among other vodníci. When the lid of such a pot is removed, the soul within (in the form of a bubble) will escape and be liberated.

Fishermen ask the vodník for help by placing a pinch of tobacco in the water and saying, “Here’s your tobacco, Lord Vodník, now give me a fish.” In Czech, Slovak and Slovene tales vodníci live in ponds or rivers; there is no mention of a particular dwelling and the “half-sunken log” does not appear. There are almost no references to vodníci in connection with sea water, which it is supposed would be dangerous or even deadly for them.

When angered, the vodyanoy breaks dams, washes down water mills, and drowns people and animals. (Consequently, fishermen, millers, and also bee-keepers make sacrifices to appease him.) He would drag people down to his underwater dwelling to serve him as slaves.

You will receive the pictured antique slavic tea pot

Only 1 left in stock

Ukrainian Canadian Dinnerware

“Most people in the Ukrainian Canadian community are familiar with Ukrainian- style ceramics. Items like platters, mugs, borshch bowls, and varenyky casseroles, all strategically adorned with red/white/ black decaled, simulated embroidery designs. The “embroidery” patterns on these ceramics look like typical, intricate Ukrainian cross-stitch patterns. Prior to the 1990s, only a few floral embroidery decals could be found adorning ceramic statues, candles, or busts of the Holy Mother or Christ Jesus. The decaled embroidered patterns generally found on the ceramic items were the typical red/white/black geometric ones. Dr. Robert Klymasz, folklorist and retired curator from the Canadian Museum of Civilization, coined an appropriate slogan, calling them “Ukrainian logos.” In North America (especially in the early years), they have become emblematic of Ukrainian identity.”

MORE THAN BABA’S DINNERWARE
A Brief History of Decaled Ukrainian-Style Ceramics in Canada
ACUAVITAE ~ Spring 2021 Volume 27 Issue 1

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Additional information

Weight670 g
Dimensions24 × 18 × 18 cm

Description

In Slavic mythology, vodyanoy or vodyanoi (Russian: водяно́й, lit. ‘[he] from the water’ or ‘watery’) is a male water spirit. Vodyanoy is said to appear as a naked old man with a frog-like face, greenish beard, and long hair, with his body covered in algae and muck, usually covered in black fish scales. He has webbed paws instead of hands, a fish’s tail, and eyes that burn like red-hot coals. He usually rides along his river on a half-sunken log, making loud splashes. Consequently, he is often dubbed “grandfather” or “forefather” by the local people. Local drownings are said to be the work of the vodyanoy (or rusalkas).

Folktales mention him as being both evil and good vodníci (relative to human beings) who do (or don’t, respectively) try to drown people when they happen to swim in their territory. Vodníci would store the souls of the drowned in porcelain teapots. They consider their teapots their most valuable heritage and display their “work”, using the number of teapots to represent their wealth and/or status among other vodníci. When the lid of such a pot is removed, the soul within (in the form of a bubble) will escape and be liberated.

Fishermen ask the vodník for help by placing a pinch of tobacco in the water and saying, “Here’s your tobacco, Lord Vodník, now give me a fish.” In Czech, Slovak and Slovene tales vodníci live in ponds or rivers; there is no mention of a particular dwelling and the “half-sunken log” does not appear. There are almost no references to vodníci in connection with sea water, which it is supposed would be dangerous or even deadly for them.

When angered, the vodyanoy breaks dams, washes down water mills, and drowns people and animals. (Consequently, fishermen, millers, and also bee-keepers make sacrifices to appease him.) He would drag people down to his underwater dwelling to serve him as slaves.

You will receive the pictured antique slavic tea pot