Queen Annes Lace

CAD $6.50

Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) common names include wild carrot, bird’s nest, bishop’s lace. Queen Anne’s lace earned its common name from a legend that tells of Queen Anne of England (1665-1714) pricking her finger and a drop of blood landed on white lace she was sewing. Belonging to the carrot family, Queen Anne’s lace is a biennial that is also known as wild carrot. Early Europeans cultivated Queen Anne’s lace, and the Romans ate it as a vegetable. American colonists boiled the taproots, sometimes in wine as a treat. Interestingly, Queen Anne’s lace is high in sugar (second only to the beet among root vegetables) and sometimes it was used among the Irish, Hindus and Jews to sweeten puddings and other foods.

Also known as ‘Wild Carrot’, this plant was gathered by Scottish women on the Sunday preceding St. Michael’s Day… Carrot Sunday. The women would sing special songs or ‘runes’ while gathering….

Cleft fruitful, fruitful, fruitful,
Joy of carrots surpassing upon me,
Michael the brave endowing me,
Bride the fair be aiding me.

Forked roots were highly prized and considered very lucky. It was predominantly used for fertility and virility in spells and rituals. Love attraction spells, lust, increased fertility, increase in potency, sexual desire. it can Bring spiritual insight or clarity while remaining grounded.

You will receive 3 sprigs in a packet

In stock

All herbs are sold only as curios and should not be consumed.

You will receive approx 2 tbs of herbs in a 2 inch by 3.5 in packet with a folklore label.

Description

Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) common names include wild carrot, bird’s nest, bishop’s lace. Queen Anne’s lace earned its common name from a legend that tells of Queen Anne of England (1665-1714) pricking her finger and a drop of blood landed on white lace she was sewing. Belonging to the carrot family, Queen Anne’s lace is a biennial that is also known as wild carrot. Early Europeans cultivated Queen Anne’s lace, and the Romans ate it as a vegetable. American colonists boiled the taproots, sometimes in wine as a treat. Interestingly, Queen Anne’s lace is high in sugar (second only to the beet among root vegetables) and sometimes it was used among the Irish, Hindus and Jews to sweeten puddings and other foods.

Also known as ‘Wild Carrot’, this plant was gathered by Scottish women on the Sunday preceding St. Michael’s Day… Carrot Sunday. The women would sing special songs or ‘runes’ while gathering….

Cleft fruitful, fruitful, fruitful,
Joy of carrots surpassing upon me,
Michael the brave endowing me,
Bride the fair be aiding me.

Forked roots were highly prized and considered very lucky. It was predominantly used for fertility and virility in spells and rituals. Love attraction spells, lust, increased fertility, increase in potency, sexual desire. it can Bring spiritual insight or clarity while remaining grounded.

Additional information

Weight 120 g
Dimensions 20 × 6 × 6 cm

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