Canopic Candle Duamatef

CAD $80.00

Burn for protection and for psychic visions.

Canopic jars used by the ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the viscera of their owner for the afterlife. They were commonly either carved from limestone or were made of pottery. These jars were used by the ancient Egyptians from the time of the Old Kingdom until the time of the Late Period or the Ptolemaic Period, by which time the viscera were simply wrapped and placed with the body. The viscera were not kept in a single canopic jar: each jar was reserved for specific organs. The name “canopic” reflects the mistaken association by early Egyptologists with the Greek legend of Canopus.

Canopic jars of the Old Kingdom were rarely inscribed and had a plain lid. In the Middle Kingdom inscriptions became more usual, and the lids were often in the form of human heads. By the Nineteenth dynasty each of the four lids depicted one of the four sons of Horus, as guardians of the organs.

Duamatef had the head of a jackal and carried and protected the stomach. Duamutef was, in ancient Egyptian religion, one of the Four Sons of Horus and a protection god of the canopic jars. Commonly he is said to be the son of the god Horus the Elder. Another myth describes Duamutef and his brothers as sons of Osiris. According to this account, they were born from a lily flower which arose from the primaeval ocean. The name Duamutef means “He who adores his mother”. In war, the most frequent cause of death was from injuries in the torso and stomach. The deity protecting this organ was associated with death by war and gained the name Duamutef, meaning “adoring his motherland”.

Burn during the next waxing moon in 15 minute increments, or seven days straight.

2 1/2″ Wide and 8 1/4″ Tall
This candle will burn approximately 140 hours.

Only 1 left in stock

Intent

Description

Burn for protection and for psychic visions.

Canopic jars used by the ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the viscera of their owner for the afterlife. They were commonly either carved from limestone or were made of pottery. These jars were used by the ancient Egyptians from the time of the Old Kingdom until the time of the Late Period or the Ptolemaic Period, by which time the viscera were simply wrapped and placed with the body. The viscera were not kept in a single canopic jar: each jar was reserved for specific organs. The name “canopic” reflects the mistaken association by early Egyptologists with the Greek legend of Canopus.

Canopic jars of the Old Kingdom were rarely inscribed and had a plain lid. In the Middle Kingdom inscriptions became more usual, and the lids were often in the form of human heads. By the Nineteenth dynasty each of the four lids depicted one of the four sons of Horus, as guardians of the organs.

Duamatef had the head of a jackal and carried and protected the stomach. Duamutef was, in ancient Egyptian religion, one of the Four Sons of Horus and a protection god of the canopic jars. Commonly he is said to be the son of the god Horus the Elder. Another myth describes Duamutef and his brothers as sons of Osiris. According to this account, they were born from a lily flower which arose from the primaeval ocean. The name Duamutef means “He who adores his mother”. In war, the most frequent cause of death was from injuries in the torso and stomach. The deity protecting this organ was associated with death by war and gained the name Duamutef, meaning “adoring his motherland”.

Burn during the next waxing moon in 15 minute increments, or seven days straight.

2 1/2″ Wide and 8 1/4″ Tall
This candle will burn approximately 140 hours.

Additional information

Weight 800 g
Dimensions 20 × 7 × 7 cm

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Canopic Candle Duamatef”